Les Morinieres Chinon

Chinon is one of the few places in the Loire Valley that makes red wines – 100% Cabernet Franc, and usually lighter and more fragrant than the Cab Francs grown in Bordeaux. I’m cracking this bottle open before dinner – and hopefully it will carry over to pair up with my pizza. This bottling is produced by Joseph Mellot.

Les Morinieres (2011) Chinon, France – $15

Photo0374Color: brilliant purple-red with a dark center.

Aroma: black pepper, tar, and some dark berry fruit. Not much cedar.

Taste: good pepper on top of the fruit – fuller bodied than most Chinons, with nice length on the finish.  Shows some nice finesse in the midpalate. With has food, this opens up a little more – quite nice.

Recommended – this is a nice example of Chinon, and worthy of having a few bottles in the cellar. One more reason my license plate is CAB FRNC.

 

A white from Gascony – Chateau Belingard

They make some lovely, crisp whites in the far southwestern corner of France. This is 60% Sauvignon Blanc and 40% Semillon, the same grapes and proportions as a typical white Bordeaux, but I’m expecting this have an extra edge from the limestone soil and mountain air.

Chateau Belingard (2012) Bergerac, France – $10

Photo0374Color: very pale yellow, about the lightest-colored wine you’ll ever see.

Aroma: gooseberry and citrus peel – lime, lemon, and grapefruit.

Taste: crisp and citrusy on the palate; with some mineral notes on the finish. This isn’t quite big enough to stand up to rich seafood or chicken in a cream sauce, but it’s a nice aperitif and is a great companion to a chunk of warm brie. Keep this in mind for the summer!

 

White Bordeaux, Tasting note, France

The Curator Red

A Rhone-style blend, with 95% Shiraz, 3% Cinsault, 1% Mourvedre, and 1% of the white Viognier grape. It’s not uncommon to see a couple of drops of Viognier in a red Rhone – it helps to open up the blend, and Viognier contributes more fruit aroma than you’d think, even in such a small proportion.

The Curator Red (2011) Coastal Region, South Africa – $11

Photo0373Color: reddish-purple, verging on black; this is quite dark.

Aroma: blackberry fruit and dried earth notes, with a little spice, licorice, and dried flowers underneath.

Taste: more fruit on the palate, with a mix of blackberry, plum, and dark cherry. This is followed by medium tannins and spice on the mid-palate and the finish. Good balance and a nice length – the fruit doesn’t dry up or get overwhelmed by the tannins. Not in the jammy category, but definitely a New World-influenced fruit-forward style.

A great $11 bottle for pizza, burgers, or nothing at all – recommended.

 

Eikeboom Pinotage

Eikeboom is a 5th generation family-owned and operated winery, dating back to 1873 when their partriach, Thomas Bain, lived on the property while constructing the railway line from Nuwekloof to Tulbagh.

Eikeboom Pinotage (2011) Western Cape, South Africa – $16

Photo0372Color: Purplish-red, and a touch on the dark side for Pinotage.

Aroma: dark and oaky, with some spice, leather, tar, and stewed fruit.

Taste: gentle up front, then building to heftier and spicier in the mid-palate. Towards the back of your mouth, the oak kicks in, and you think it’s going to end up tight, but then the finish is the most complex part, with spice, a touch of heat, berry fruit, and vanilla.

I opened this before dinner. Let’s see what an hour of air and a spicy sausage pizza can do for this…

This has helped. More smoke and fruit up front, a little more complex in the mid-palate, softer on the finish. A nice bottle, but not quite good enough to get awarded recommended status.

 

The Royal Shiraz-Cabernet

This is a blend of 60% Shiraz and 40% Cab, from the Swartland region of South Africa – the breadbasket of the country, as well as a notable producer of wine and olive oil. It’s named in honor of The Royal Hotel, which vies for the title of South Africa’s oldest inn.

The Royal Shiraz-Cabernet Sauvignon (2009) Swartland, South Africa – $9

Photo0371Color: dark purplish red, shading almost to black in the center.

Aroma: brambly red and blue fruit notes, with some smoke and spice underneath.

Taste: quite Australian in style, with loads of jammy fruit, warm spice, and a hefty finish. Good acidity up front and in the mid-palate makes this a good choice for food, especially anything with tomato- or vinegar-based sauce.

I could see this with a big plate of Memphis barbeque. Quite a nice wine for the money – you’d be hard-pressed to find a comparable Shiraz blend from Australia at even 50% higher in price. Recommended.

Winetasting report: Trader Joe’s, Ann Arbor

Stopped into the Ann Arbor store for their Saturday afternoon tasting – a typical crowded weekend afternoon in a Trader Joe’s! They had three wines on tasting, and I’d only had one of them before, so I ran the flight.

Villa Sonia Pinot Grigio (2012) Venezia, Italy – $6

More body than typical for a Pinot Grigio, with lower acidity and a full mouthfeel. This is something to have with food, not as a cocktail-hour drink. A simple risotto or some poached fish would be good pairings.

Valreas (2012) Cotes du Rhone Villages, France – $7

I tried the 2011 vintage of this wine just a few months ago, and I have to say I prefer it. The 2012 bottling over-the-top on the oak, and you don’t get nearly the amount of fruit as in the 2011. Skip the 2012.

Revelation Cabernet Sauvignon (2011) Pays d’Oc, France – $6

This was really tight. The Pays d’Oc region is mostly too hot to make good, expressive Cabernet – much like the Central Valley of California. I found this to be a little stemmy as well. Not recommended.

Secateurs Chenin Blanc

I was able to do some shopping at Village Corner in Ann Arbor today, which some of my Dayton buddies have raved about. They have quite a nice selection, and I’m sure I’ll be back. In particular, they have some South African wines I haven’t run across before, and I’m trying one of those half-dozen or so tonight.

The name of the winery, “Secateurs”, comes from the French word for the ubiquitous garden shear, which is an everyday tool in the vineyard for pruning, cutting away diseased growth, and harvesting. The Swartland region lies almost due north of Capetown, inland from the Coastal range, and is a major grain producer in the lowland areas, in addition to the dry-farmed vineyards along the ridges and mountain slopes.

Secateurs Chenin Blanc (2012) Swartland, South Africa – $15.99

Photo0369Color: a pale, brassy yellow.

Aroma: the nose has a combination of Golden Delicious apple and citrus fruits, with just a touch of floral notes.

Taste: crisp and refreshing, with good acidity and hint of residual carbon dioxide. Taste notes are predominately citrus up front, with apple and some musky floral notes on the finish. This has the light body typical for the grape, and is balanced just until the very finish, when it gets a touch acrid.

Decent enough, but for this price range it ought to have some more mellow fruit notes on the end.